Steel Fabrication

Star bicycle circa 1883-1890

Star bicycle circa 1883-1890

The earliest known production of steel dates back to about 4,000 years ago and has been the forerunner of metals used in production ever since. Anything that has been made out of metal in the last 100 years, first used steel as it’s staple material. Ranging from frames for skyscrapers to boat hulls, steel has been used in just about every industry across the globe. Steel was first used on bicycle frames in the mid 1800’s, only in small portions, and gradually over the decades steel was used to construct whole frames. Bicycle frames made from steel dominated the market for the next 100 years or so until the introduction of Aluminum into the bicycle industry in the 1980’s.

Today steel frames are a major staple in the bicycle industry. Modern road race frames are constructed from steel alloys, and with new advancements being made frequently in the process of manufacturing steel tubing and

Custom steel MTB frame made by FTW

Custom steel MTB frame made by FTW

heat treating, the use and effectiveness for steel tubing in a bicycle frame becomes more and more apparent as the years go on.

People see labeled production frames, but don’t feel that the particular design is suited for them. So instead of getting a high quality product they settle for something much less.

FTW has been making steel frames throughout his career and is well versed in it’s characteristics and applications in today’s world of bicycle frames and will collaborate with the customer on specific details regarding what they are looking to get out of their bicycle, whether they be a professional racer or first time cyclists. As for the composition of the alloys used in building a custom frame, we use varying suppliers of steel tubing to match the needs or wants of a customer getting a frame built. Our most commonly used steel tubes are made by Peggo-Richie and we get the material from Richard Sachs directly. Columbus Tubing has been supplying material in our frame designs as well and based off what they offer, we have a wide variety of materials to be used in the manufacture of custom, light weight, steel frames.

Custom made steel bicycle stem

Custom made steel bicycle stem

FTW is well versed in the drafting, designing and manufacturing other steel bicycle parts such as forks, stems, handlebars, dropouts, etc…

If you have any interest in custom steel frame work or any questions about our process, shoot us an email at: frankthewelder@comcast.net or check out the Frank The Welder Facebook page by clicking on the link.

8 Responses to Steel Fabrication

  1. Dan says:

    Hello,
    Truly artistic work you do sir. While I’m not currently in the market for a new bike (just bought a hardtail), the wheels in my head are turning about doing a full-suspension trail bike at some point. I am fairly mechanically inclined, and can weld and fabricate to a degree, so the idea of building my own frame is intriguing. At the same time, that is also the sort of thing I may prefer to leave to a true professional such as yourself. While not put-off by aluminum, I’d like to see examples of steel-framed FS bikes utilizing current suspension theory and design. Is it feasible to build a steel-framed FS bike with about 5 inches of travel and still have it weigh in under 30 pounds? Thank you for your time.

  2. Carl says:

    I really love the looks of the welds on the frame before they are painted! Is it possible to leave the frame raw and just powdercoat or paint it clear?

    • FrankWeld says:

      Thanks! Yeah we can clear coat frames, or even some customers have really appreciated having a “tinted” clear coat in blue, red, green etc…Turquoise looks rad.

  3. Evan says:

    Hey, frank, would you be willing to build an r9 with a 62.5 deg head angle and size it for a 6’5 rider no shock needed

  4. Piankhy Faussett says:

    I would like to know can you give me a rough estimate on how much would it cost to manufacture custom seat post to mimic the ones found on the specialized Allez dsw and seat post on the Jamis sonik I know it’s quite expensive and you possibly need a cad file and can you give me a rough estimate to make the seat post out of aluminum about 350mm and the forks out of aluminum or chromoly

    • FrankWeld says:

      hi, please send an email to the shop. my email is on the header of the opening page of the website. I ma looking forward to helping.

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